Voting on street name ideas for the Downtown Riverfront redevelopment

The city of Eugene put out the call for street name ideas for the Downtown Riverfront redevelopment and the community responded! More than 600 people contributed about 1,100 ideas. The 12 semi-finalists are now available to be voted on and we’d love your input.

Community members are invited to select their favorite street name options for the new Downtown Riverfront at https://engage.eugene-or.gov/name-our-streets.

Voting will be open through October 18. The voting results will be given to the Mayor, who will help make the final decision. 

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To ensure that street names are relevant to Eugene and the new Downtown Riverfront neighborhood, suggestions had to fall into one of three categories:

Community/Culture – From Kalapuyans to Bill Bowerman, choose a person, place, or thing that embodies Eugene.

Ecology/River – From our rivers to surrounding mountains and the valley we live in, ideas representing the ecology of Eugene are as abundant as our native plants. 

Industry/Energy – There are major industries that are important to Eugene’s history and the energy of steam and water have played an important role at the riverfront site. While timber has historically been a large driver of our economy, agriculture and education have also played major roles, and the technology community is steadily growing. 

Additionally, names had to meet practical guidelines such as not exceeding 20 characters or being too similar to another street name in Lane County. Names of people who are still living or already have a public space named after them were also removed. An internal group at the City reviewed all suggested names and narrowed down the choices based on the criteria. 

 

‘Leaving a legacy for the future’ – 2,000 sequoia trees planted by 2021 in Eugene

Eugene hopes to add a lot more green here in 2021. They hope to do it with 2,000 sequoia trees, and community members can look at how you can get involved in the effort. The City of Eugene is on a mission to plant at least 2,000 sequoias by the year 2021, before the IAAF World Championships. “This is really leaving a legacy for the future and when the city and all of the constituents in it can come together and plant trees, that’s building a stronger community,” says Heidi Lakics with the City of Eugene.

Lane County residents can help by picking up a free tree from Alton Baker Park at an event this month. Lane Community College is already on board. “50 years from now students will be welcomed into the campus with a gorgeous giant sequoia forest,” says LCC instructor Timothy Ingalsbee. Their goal is to bring back wildlife and plant 100 sequoias these next couple of months. “There’s been an immense amount of clear cutting going on around the campus and so we lost a lot of forest to land speculators,” Ingalsbee says, “so planting these giant sequoias will partly compensate for that.” Of course, people need to have the adequate space–that is, at least 20 feet of space between any buildings, sidewalks or any other trees.

“People need to keep in mind that these are little baby trees that we are giving away and these are going to turn into big, massive trees, so you have to have the right space,” says Heidi Lakics with City of Eugene. She says community members are already on board too. “We’ve had a lot of requests for giant sequoias; people are really on board with this. Again, it’s leaving a legacy for the future and that makes people really excited.” This will be a legacy that will live for centuries to come. The City of Eugene looks forward to giving away hundreds of baby sequoias.

If you are interested in picking up a free tree, you can do so on Sunday, October 20, from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Alton Baker Park in the native nursery.

Story by Kassandra Gutierrez and KVAL.com Staff from Thursday, October 3rd, 2019.

Southwest Hills Neighborhood Association 22nd Annual Picnic

SHiNA 22nd Annual Picnic On Sunday, September 8th from 4:00 – 7:00 p.m 

At Wayne Morse Family Farm – 595 Crest Drive

Join your neighbors and friends for our special SHiNA event. The Wayne Morse Family Farm shelter is repaired, ready and waiting for the potluck, so please bring food to share! We’re featuring Espacio Flamenco which creates a space in Portland for flamenco arts & culture to be experienced and enjoyed through music and dance performance. Also kids (of all ages) look forward to participating in bubble and butterfly making activities.

This year we’re holding a silent auction fundraiser with 45 plus goods and services donations to bid on that have a total value worth more than $1700. Come to meet and connect with your neighbors! Learn about what Southwest Hills Neighborhood Association is doing for disaster preparedness and what you can do to help. Check out our community partners and local non-profits at their tables.We hope to see you all there, bring your neighbor, meet new people and have fun!

EWEB Pledge to Prepare – September

Increasing our overall disaster resilience is the responsibility of every community member. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management encourages residents to be prepared to be on their own for a minimum of two weeks.
By providing tools and resources to our EWEB customers, we are working toward one goal – a more resilient community.
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Ways to Conserve Water in the Garden

The Oregon State University Extension Service offers the following tips to conserve water in gardens and yards during dry summer months:

    • Water your lawn more deeply and less frequently. If you typically water three to four times per week, it’s okay to cut that to one to two times per week.
    • Plant drought-tolerant turf grass. Tall fescue is hardy, wide-bladed and deep-rooted. Perennial ryegrass and creeping fescue can also tolerate some dryness.
    • Choose drought-tolerant plants such as creeping zinnia and sea poppy for your landscape. Native plants such as the Oregon iris and Pacific wax myrtle tolerate dry summers well.
    • For most plants, watering deeply and close to the roots is more important than frequency. Study each plant’s watering requirements. For vegetables, soak soil about six inches deep. Water to a depth of about a foot and a half for shrubs. Trees need water about two feet deep.
    • Mulching is critical because it improves soil structure, helps retain water in the ground and reduces weeds. Use compost-based mulches for vegetables and woody mulches for ornamental plants. Spread the mulch about two to three inches thick on the soil around your garden.
    • Water early in the morning before the day heats up.
    • Use an efficient irrigation system, such as soaker hoses or drip irrigation. If you choose a sprinkler system, select a low-pressure, in-ground system that does not shoot up in the air.